mirth

mirth
mirth, glee, jollity, hilarity are comparable when they mean the mood or temper of a person or a group of persons manifesting joy or high spirits especially in laughter, play, or merrymaking.
Mirth often implies lightness of heart and a love of gaiety; it may, however, imply great amusement or cause for laughter
{

Darcy was not of a disposition in which happiness overflows in mirthAusten

}
{

some of them literally throwing themselves down on the ground in convulsions of unholy mirthKipling

}
{

they seem to quiver on the edge of mirth, as if some deep continual laughter was repressed— Hallam Tennyson

}
Glee is often employed in reference to an individual who by reason of special circumstances is filled with joy, delight, or happiness, and shows his exultancy by laughter, smiles, and cries of joy
{

full well they laughed, with counterfeited glee, at all his jokes, for many a joke had he— Goldsmith

}
{

the best of constitutions will not prevent ambitious politicians from succumbing with glee and gusto to the temptations of power— Huxley

}
But glee may express the exultation of one who takes more or less malicious delight in another's misfortunes or predicaments
{

in great glee over his friend's embarrassment

}
{

with malicious glee they quoted a previous boast of the President's— F. L. Allen

}
{

it betrayed the glee felt by the mean-spirited when they see people who do not deserve humiliation forced to suffer it— West

}
Jollity, on the other hand, usually implies mirth in a group, especially a merrymaking group. Distinctively, however, it connotes exuberance and lack of constraint and may imply revelry of any kind
{

midnight shout and revelry, tipsy dance and jollityMilton

}
{

contributed more than his share of the jollity by turning out puns by the hamperful— Balliett

}
Hilarity fundamentally implies the exhilaration of spirits (as by wine, pleasurable excitement, or great amusement)
{

wine gives not light, gay, ideal hilarity, but tumultuous, noisy, clamorous merriment— Johnson

}
{

through all the works of Chaucer, there reigns a cheerfulness, a manly hilarityColeridge

}
but it often carries implications of boisterousness or exuberance
{

he entered wholeheartedly into the hilarity of the boys, till he too was talking only nonsense— Rolvaag

}
{

the hilarity of a New Year's Eve celebration

}
Analogous words: cheerfulness or cheer, lightheartedness, joyfulness, gladness, happiness (see corresponding adjectives at GLAD): joy, *pleasure, delight: merriment, blitheness, jocundity, joviality (see corresponding adjectives at MERRY)
Contrasted words: *sadness, depression, dejection, melancholy, blues, dumps: *tedium, boredom, ennui

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Игры ⚽ Поможем написать реферат
Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mirth — mirth; mirth·ful; mirth·less; mirth·ful·ly; mirth·ful·ness; mirth·less·ly; mirth·less·ness; …   English syllables

  • Mirth — Mirth, n. [OE. mirthe, murthe, merthe, AS. myr[eth], myrg[eth], merh[eth], mirh[eth]. See {Merry}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Merriment; gayety accompanied with laughter; jollity. [1913 Webster] Then will I cause to cease . . . from the streets of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mirth — [ mɜrθ ] noun uncount MAINLY LITERARY happy laughter ╾ mirth|ful adjective ╾ mirth|ful|ly adverb …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • mirth — [mə:θ US mə:rθ] n [U] [: Old English; Origin: myrgth, from myrge; MERRY] literary happiness and laughter ▪ Her body began to shake with mirth. >mirthful adj …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • mirth — (n.) O.E. myrgð joy, pleasure, from P.Gmc. *murgitha (Cf. M.Du. merchte), noun of quality from *murgjo (see MERRY (Cf. merry); also see TH (Cf. th)). Mirthquake entertainment that excites convulsive laughter first attested 1928, in ref. to Harold …   Etymology dictionary

  • mirth — [n] great joy amusement, cheer, cheerfulness, convulsions, entertainment, festivity, frivolity, frolic, fun, gaiety, gladness, glee, happiness, hilarity, hysteria, hysterics, jocularity, jocundity, jollity, joviality, joyousness, kicks*, laughs,… …   New thesaurus

  • mirth — ► NOUN ▪ amusement, especially as expressed in laughter. DERIVATIVES mirthful adjective. ORIGIN Old English, related to MERRY(Cf. ↑merry) …   English terms dictionary

  • mirth — [mʉrth] n. [ME myrthe < OE myrgth, pleasure, joy < base of myrig, pleasant: see MERRY] joyfulness, gaiety, or merriment, esp. when characterized by laughter …   English World dictionary

  • mirth — mirthless, adj. /merrth/, n. 1. gaiety or jollity, esp. when accompanied by laughter: the excitement and mirth of the holiday season. 2. amusement or laughter: He was unable to conceal his mirth. [bef. 900; ME mirthe, OE myrgth. See MERRY, TH1]… …   Universalium

  • mirth — n. 1) to provoke mirth 2) general mirth * * * [mɜːθ] general mirth to provoke mirth …   Combinatory dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”